16.4.14

OULIPOST HALFTIME REPORT


I've had to take a break from Ouliposting but hopefully I'll be back in the game again soon. In the meantime, The Found Poetry Review has compiled a "halftime report" of the Oulipost Project. Thank you to Doug Luman for the shout-out. Check out all the cool work that everyone's been doing!

Read the OULIPOST HALFTIME REPORT here.

12.4.14

OULIPOST #11: UNIVOCALISM

(Image credit: http://jakndaxta.deviantart.com/art/Starry-YOLO-346735549)

YOLO

Work strong
to rock world.

For our world
too short.

Sources: Front page of The Montreal Gazette. 11th April, 2014.
Kennedy, Mark. "'This comes as an unexpected shock':PM from The Montreal Gazette. 11th April, 2014. A8 section.
Method: A univocalic text is one written with a single vowel. It is consequently a lipogram in all the other vowels. If he had been univocally minded, Hamlet might have exclaimed, “Be? Never be? Perplexed quest: seek the secret!” All words used must be sourced from your newspaper. Read more poems from the comments section here.

The vowel I chose was 'o'.

10.4.14

OULIPOST #10: SNOWBALL

I, Alien

I.
We.
One.
Wait.
Years.

O,
It
Was
Hard,
Human.

O!
It,
Bug
Flaw
Stark
Unseen
Dangers
Security
Penetrate
Impossible.

Source: Manjoo, Farhad. "In rush to innovate, web left exposed" from The Montreal Gazette. 10th April, 2014. A3 section.
Method: This procedure requires the first word of a text to have only one letter, the second two, the third three, and so on as far as resourcefulness and inspiration allow. The first word of a snowball is normally a vowel: in English, a I or O.
From your newspaper, select a starting vowel and then continue adding words of increasing length from the same source article or passage. Challenge yourself further by only using words in order as you encounter them in the text. Read more "snowball" poems in the comments section here.

I channeled X-Files for this one. I miss Mulder and Scully...

9.4.14

OULIPOST #9: HEADLINES

virus threatens pork production
new U.S. ambassador feels heat

diplomat expulsions raise some eyebrows
universities unsure what future holds

tight-lipped
tough talk

battle for control in larger cities
a century of conflict

breaking down the issues
zeroing in on Canada's zombie safety zones

solutions made for a changing world
solutions at hand to level the playing field

with divisive politics defeated,
let hope reign

hog heaven

Source: Headlines from The Montreal Gazette. 9th April, 2014.
Method: Compose a poem whose body is sourced from article headlines in your newspaper. Read more "headline" poems in the comments section here.

I imaged this poem as the synopsis for a zombie flick set in the Great White North with product placements by the pork industry, um, for some reason. And yes, "Zeroing in on Canada's Zombie Safety Zones" is a real headline.

8.4.14

OULIPOST #8: BEAUTIFUL INLAW (BEAU PRESENT)

I ram 
I arm 
I ism

Or

I aim
I soar
I am 

So 

I roam
I om
I am

Sources: Front page of The Montreal Gazette. 8th April, 2014.
I also used the Scrabble Word Finder to find my words.
Method: Select a name from one of your newspaper articles, famous or not. Compose a poem using only words that can be made from the letters in that person’s name. For example, if you selected “John Travolta,” you may only use words that can be made from the letters A, J, H, L, N, O, R, T and V. Read more "beau present" poems in the comments section here.

For my "beau present" poem, the name I chose was Marois, as in Pauline Marois, the newly ousted former premier of Quebec, giving me access to the letters: M, A, R, O, I, and S. 

OULIPOST #7: N+7


For 33 deadbeats,
the electron camshaft

was dominated by pollutions,
pronounciations and polymaths.

Now, it is up to us
to castor our bananas.

No matter which passion you support,
make your volley heard on jabs that countermand.

Sources: Words found on front page of The Montreal Gazette. 7th April, 2014.
I also found my nouns using the N+7 generator here.
Method: Select a passage from one of your newspaper articles. Replace each noun in the passage with the seventh noun following it in the dictionary. Read more "N+7" poems in the comments section here.

Proud to have voted and to be a Quebecer on this historic day.

7.4.14

OULIPOST #6: BLANK VERSE AMIDST THE PROSE

The Politician

The road ahead won't be an easy one.
Opponents concentrated their efforts.

In the final moments of a campaign
that saw him catch his share of lucky breaks,

and took to the sky for one final blitz.
People packed into the tiny building.

"I know you don't want us to just come here.
Bring back the dignity that comes with jobs."

He has a good feeling about his chance...

Source: Curtis, Christopher. "Liberals blitz regions one last time" from The Montreal Gazette online. 6th April, 2014. Read the article here.
Method: Compose a poem using unintentional lines of iambic pentameter found in your newspaper. Read more "blank verse" poems in the comments section here.

Ok. This poem was a little late but better late than never.

5.4.14

OULIPOST #5: TAUTOGRAM

Image credit: (http://www.westislandchronicle.com/Community/2014-04-02/article-3674439/West-Island-candidates-talk-issues/1)

Reporters ride
recent rising 
rivals' rhetoric.

Recruit real.
Represent reason.
Run rare.

Respect rights.
Recover. Return.
Recognize relief.

*

Go out and vote on Monday, Quebec.

Sources: 
"R'" words found only from the front page of The Montreal Gazette. 5th April, 2014. A1 section.

Freed, Josh. "I want a Quebec where 'nous' again means all of us" from The Montreal Gazette. 5th April, 2014. A2 section. Online version here.

Authier, Philip. "Hot Swing Ridings" from The Montreal Gazette. 5th April, 2014. A4 section. Online version here.

Method: Tautogram. Compose a poem whose words — or at least the principal ones — all begin with the same letter. The words must be sourced from your newspaper. Read more "tautogram" poems in the comments section here.